Ida Harm

Ida Harm
idaharm@gmail.com
www.idaharm.com
www.facebook.com/ida.harm.5
www.instagram.com/ida_harm
twitter.com/idaharm


I remember very well my first creative impulse which pushed me to express an emotion through drawing: it was in 1999 a year in which I travelled a lot between green lush countries of Northern Europe and barren deserts of North Africa where life clutches at every last drop of humidity.

Ida Harm
Olive tree on Tuscan hill, diptic 100 x 200 cm

In this pilgrimage the tree is an element of the landscape which captures and strikes me, a fascinating conducting thread that, like a small seed, embeds itself and begins to root itself across many questions, visions and intuitions. In that very moment I started working on trees.

Ida Harm
Birches, diptic 150 x 200 cm

Alongside this subject, is the written word, often taken from English poetry or prose. Those words, as the rustling of the leaves, spurts murmured words, emphasizing the concept, suggesting images that work on the subconscious of the observer like a brain-storming.

Ida Harm
Wood in the snow, 100 x 150 cm

Analyzing backward the evolution of my trees, I then realized how much I have personally changed and how trees, gardens, forests, seeds where writing my biography throu images and symbols.

Ida Harm
Old Chestnut trees, 200 x 100 cm

At some point the lonely holy tree transforms into a forest with reduced dimensions, a
pastoral wood, where a path is merely suggested, often shown up by the light. In this wood the plants are those that suggest to the vagabond, the pilgrim, the nomad the way but without ever wholly revealing it.

I am getting lost in this concept at the moment..

Ida Harm
Oak and vineyard, diptic 150 x 200 cm

Ida Harm
Tree stories, 150 x 100 cm

Kevin Tole

Kevin Tole
kevin.tole@virginmedia.com
www.kevintole.com


My painting and drawing practise appear to have diverged significantly. In the past both were a reflection of each other and I laid great importance upon sketchbook work to the extent that I would work every day into a sketchbook. Over the last two years my drawing has become fixated on a particular subjects and has developed its own stature. 

Kevin Tole
Antony Plane in Winter, Charcoal, pastel, acrylic, gouache, water on paper. Free hanging on battens, 150 x 250 cm, 2017

This started with a year-long project working on one group of three trees on the edge of Dartmoor, producing an A1 charcoal drawing per week. That has moved on to further projects in Cornwall with trees and Glasgow on the Titan cranes along the Clyde. 

Kevin Tole
No. 29 Danescombe Oak, Beech Charcoal, Compressed Charcoal, White Conte, White Charcoal on paper, 59 x 84 cm, 2016

In all the projects I like to use materials found in the immediate areas to the subjects commonly making my own charcoal in which the source wood is intimately connected to the subject of the drawing. 

Kevin Tole
Antony Walnut No. 1, Charcoal (various) on paper, 59 x 84 cm, 2016

The drawings have all increased in size because this allows me to make and examine gestural marks, to move from the finger to the shoulder and to seek the chance mark arising from the conscious build-up of layer upon layer. This has led me into etching and printmaking to move ideas sideways and forwards.

Kevin Tole
Summer Beech Tree, Etching, Limited Edition of 20, 35 x 45 cm, 2017

Kevin Tole
Fagus silvatica Field, Beech Charcoal, various compressed charcoals, white, charcoal, white conte, 150 x 575 cm, 2017

Claire Cansick

Claire Cansick
clairecansick@gmail.com
www.clairecansick.com


I paint the woodland around me with a view to explore the nature, character and life story of each tree, as if painting portrait sitters. This is something I have done for several years and I began by recording the trees around the lanes where I live in Norfolk. It was as if my eyes were opened to the stature and majesty of the trees and their silent, still history marking their place through time.  I started to paint them with great enthusiasm, relishing the challenges and wrestling with colour; I like to dissect the colours of the landscape; colours lie within colours and I represent this by layering them over and over in glazes of oil. My initial drawings remain incredibly important throughout the painting process and they are the beginning of the abstraction of colour, shape and of compositional development. The results are that the colours are heightened and the images are stylised as my attention is drawn to the linear content and the skeletal silhouette on the canvas. The works have developed into painterly images of the woods around the county and individual trees within open landscapes. My skills in oil painting has been largely self taught through my own practice and experimentation with the medium.

Claire Cansick
Holkham, oil on wood panel, 2017

Claire Cansick
Towards Burnham, oil on wood panel, 2017

Claire Cansick
Barton Pond, oil on wood panel, 2017

Kerry Harding

Kerry Harding
hardingkerry@yahoo.com
kerryharding.co.uk


Present and remembered, steadfast and fleeting, noticed, forgotten and then rediscovered. The trees that inhabit my daily run are the constants that anchor my sense of place. They have become like family or good friends and after 15 years of daily passing offer unconditional and unwavering support. 

Kerry Harding
Still the Wind

Kerry Harding
Gate

This experience of the familiar landscape is mirrored in my painting process; old paintings are continuously reworked. Paint is taken away to leave the stains and traces of past images which are then layered with fresh and immediate applications of paint. My love of paint as matter and the physicality of manipulating it is continuously edited down to create a poetic balance of extremes. Old and new, faint and bold, fast and slow, delicate and strong.

Kerry Harding
NewhamsTree II

Kerry Harding
Steep Holly

Howard Phipps

Howard Phipps
howardphipps@icloud.com

www.rowleygallery.com/Artist-Howard-Phipps.aspx


Howard Phipps is a painter and printmaker with a special interest in Wood engraving. This is a traditional method of making relief prints , originating in England in the 18th century, where an image is engraved in reverse on very smooth end grain boxwood, from which prints will be taken on completion. 
The artist is based in Wiltshire, Southern England, and much of his work is inspired by the chalk downland of this area. He makes drawings and watercolours on location, and has a particular interest in mans impact on this landscape where there are frequent reminders of remote human history. Ancient tracks he finds compelling, and trees, the Beech especially, frequently feature in his work as they line these old ways. His often large preliminary drawings made over several sessions form the basis of his engravings.

Howard Phipps
Ebble Valley Oak, wood engraving

Howard Phipps has exhibited frequently at Royal Academy Exhibitions in London, since 1985, where he has also been a winner of the contemporary Print Prize. He has had numerous one man exhibitions, and has work in several collections including The British Museum [ 12 engravings ], The Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, and three Wiltshire County collections.
In addition to making work for exhibitions Howard has illustrated a number of books, and has a strong association with The Whittington Press who published his own purely visual collections exploring the theme of Interior spaces. Whittington also published ‘Ebble Valley’ with both text and engravings by the artist, being his observations of the landscape where he has lived for thirty years.

Howard Phipps
Beech Tree Cloister , pencil drawing


Le peintre et graveur Howard Phipps porte un intérêt particulier à la gravure sur bois. Il utilise une méthode traditionnelle de taille d’épargne, originaire d'Angleterre au XVIIIème siècle, où une image est gravée inversée en bois de bout sur un buis au grain très doux, à partir de laquelle seront réalisés les tirages finals.
L'artiste est installé dans le Wiltshire, au sud de l'Angleterre. Une grande part de son travail est inspirée par les collines de craie de cette région. Il réalise des dessins et des aquarelles sur place et s'intéresse tout particulièrement aux impacts de l'homme sur ce paysage, qui rappellent fréquemment l'histoire reculée de l’humanité. Il trouve captivants les chemins anciens, et les arbres. Le hêtre en particulier figure souvent dans son travail, car il borde ces voies anciennes. Souvent de grand format, ses dessins préliminaires, réalisés sur plusieurs séances, forment la base de ses gravures.

Howard Phipps
Ox Drove, wood engraving
Howard Phipps a participé régulièrement aux expositions de la Royal Academy à Londres depuis 1985. Il y a de plus remporté le prix de la gravure contemporaine. Il a présenté de nombreuses expositions personnelles. Son travail est présent dans plusieurs collections, incluant le British Museum (12 gravures), le musée Ashmolean d’Oxford et trois collections du comté de Wiltshire.
En plus de créer pour des expositions, Howard a illustré de nombreux livres et collabore étroitement avec The Whittington Press. Whittington - qui publie ses propres collections purement visuelles explorant le thème des espaces intérieurs - a également publié « Ebble Valley » (« La vallée de l’Ebble »), avec des textes et des gravures de l'artiste, qui rassemble ses observations du paysage où il a vécu pendant trente ans.

Howard Phipps
Ox Drove in Winter, wood engraving

Tom Deakins

Tom Deakins
tomdeakins31@gmail.com
http://www.chappelgalleries.co.uk/exhibitions-06/tom-deakins/tom-deakins.htm
http://aubreyartgallery.com/pages/deakins/tomdeakins.html


By Lesley Nolan, a Trustee of the Fry Gallery

I first encountered Tom Deakins’ work about ten years ago – the small oil painting on sale was a meticulously rendered image of Great Dunmow’s roofline and pond, that was astonishing in its detail and soft autumn colouring, which put me in mind of Vermeer’s famous view of his home town of Delft, so lovingly was it painted. It is that intensity of feeling for a particular place that Deakins manages to capture in his work – not just how something looks, but also how he, as an artist, has experienced it: the crunch of snow underfoot, or the smell if summer rain on tarmac, or the warmth of sunlight on a brick wall.

Tom Deakins
Posthumous Portrait of an Oak Tree, oil on canvas, 2006, 24 x 61 cm

His vision is imbued with the sense of place that artists – such as John Constable, Samuel Palmer and Paul Nash – have written about, indeed Deakins has said that his home in Great Dunmow and its surroundings have his inspiration for over forty years. His paintings bear the sign of the human activity that has shaped the local environment, whether by agriculture or building, accident or design, and whilst being devoid of human figures, are saturated with human presence and meaning. All carry a quiet hint of the poetic, or the mysterious, the unexplained. Sometimes he ventures further afield to Suffolk, Wales and the Lake District.

Tom Deakins
Winter to Spring, oil on canvas, 2013, 23 x 46 cm


Par Lesley Nolan, responsable à la Fry Gallery

J'ai rencontré pour la première fois le travail de Tom Deakins il y a environ dix ans : la petite peinture à l'huile en vente était une image de la ligne des toits et de l'étang de Great Dunmow d’un rendu méticuleux, stupéfiante par ses détails et sa douce couleur automnale. Elle me rappelait la célèbre vue de Vermeer de sa ville natale de Delft, tant elle était peinte avec amour. C'est cette intensité de sentiment pour un endroit particulier que Deakins parvient à capturer dans son travail - non pas seulement l’apparence de quelque chose, mais aussi la façon dont lui l'a éprouvée en tant qu'artiste : le crissement de la neige sous les pieds, ou l'odeur de la pluie d'été sur le goudron, ou la chaleur du soleil sur un mur de brique.

Tom Deakins
The Last Ash Tree, oil on canvas, 2014, 23 x 46 cm

Sa vision est imprégnée de ce sens du lieu au sujet duquel des artistes tels que John Constable, Samuel Palmer et Paul Nash ont écrit. Effectivement Deakins a dit que sa maison de Great Dunmow et ses alentours lui ont fourni son inspiration pendant plus de quarante ans. Ses peintures portent le signe de l'activité humaine qui a façonné l'environnement local, par l'agriculture ou la construction, accidentellement ou à dessein. Tout en étant dépourvues de figures humaines, elles sont saturées de présence humaine et de sens. Toutes transmettent un paisible soupçon de poésie, ou de mystère, d'inexpliqué. Parfois, il s'aventure plus loin jusqu’au Suffolk, au Pays de Galles et au Lake District.

Tom Deakins
Winter's Eye, oil on canvas, 2010, 25 x 30 cm

Ann Blockley

Ann Blockley
ann@annblockley.com
www.annblockley.com


When I was seven I lived under a rhododendron bush in The Wood. It was my Gaudi palace with its complex architecture of intricately woven branches, twisting, carved columns studded with the ruby reds of sumptuous flowers. It was my secret haven where I could stand on a throne of logs to recite the poems in my head and make drawings. The rooks were my companions and a mossy carpet embroidered with the stars of fallen blossom was my playground. 

Ann Blockley
Teasels by the pond

Years later I visit a different group of trees. I watch a new generation of rooks gather and swoop and listen to their cacophony of sound as the sun lowers itself into the tangled black lace of the treetops. I am no longer a princess with palace but I imagine myself to be an artist and I collect leaves and acorns, thoughts and words and feel my way into the moods and seasons of nature. I imagine I am a creature scrambling through earthy tunnels under the brambled hedgerow, weaving my way around gnarled roots and burrows.  I imagine I am a bird, perching in that hedge with its skeins and creeping ribbons of berries.  I watch the light pierce through gaps in the labyrinth of marks and shimmer in the ponds where I see the entangled trees and undergrowth reflected.

Ann Blockley
 Last light in the woven hedge

I take these thoughts back to my studio which is built from ancient beams of oak and elm. Here I can remain connected with the poetic, organic world of the woodland, hedge and field. I let the paint flow and mingle, using marks in ways that evoke and suggest something of nature’s words and imagery. The challenge is to convey a mood and create an air of mystery or magic. The aim is to subtly alter reality into something more elusive. I enjoy playing with marks that are intriguing in themselves and sometimes merely allude to the facts. However, I am influenced by the way that the wanderings and happenings of paint often echo nature itself. 

Ann Blockley
Wild woodland tapestry

I sense my paintings are changing, growing, some shoots are withering, others are flourishing in fresh directions- just like the trees that have always informed them and influenced me. 

Ann Blockley
River Sunset

Jelly Green

Jelly Green
jelly_green_1992@hotmail.co.uk
www.jelly-green.com


John Fowles: “Trees are like humans: they need their pasts to feed their presents”

Jelly Green
Leaves in an English Wood, watercolour on paper, 2015, 29 x 151 cm

I have always been drawn to woodlands. That sense of stepping into another world, another story: a place of mystery, bursting with a vibrancy and life that feeds the imagination and palette.

Jelly Green
Puzzlewood, oil on canvas, 2016-2017, 152 x 183 cm

As a child, I spent long periods of time in a native British woodland on my Grandparents farm in Suffolk. Over the course of the year I would watch the leaves change colour: the vivid green canopy of oaks, ashes and hornbeams in the summer months gradually fading away as the autumn approached, until all that was left were the bones of the trees, brittle against a grey sky, and the occasional drumming of pheasants battling with the branches overhead. The melancholy of winter then giving way to hope as tree buds begin to unfurl in the spring. British trees and woodlands are markers. They mark time and place. This is something that I try to reflect in my work. 

Jelly Green
Ancient Oak Glemham 2, charcoal on paper, 2015, 84 x 60 cm

I carried this woodland within me when in 2015 I went to Brazil to paint the rainforest. Nothing, prepared me for the explosion of colour and sound on my arrival. The denseness of light and dark, the sheer scale of the trees, was both breathtaking and humbling, and inevitably, hugely inspiring for my work. It is difficult to conjure that sense of ‘being' - of living and working in such an enormous ‘organism’ that sustains so much life. Each tree is an entire world in its own right, its trunk and limbs home to monkeys, bats, spiders, sleuths, moths, parrots …. Night as busy, if not busier than day. 

Jelly Green
Winter Rendham 1, oil on canvas, 2013, 13 x 18 cm

When beginning a piece of work I usually start by making several charcoal drawings and smaller oil or watercolour paintings with the subject in front of me. I then take these studies back to my studio to work from for a larger canvas. I find working in-situ incredibly important as it keeps a painting moving, there is a real sense of immediacy when painting outdoors. Landscapes change enormously throughout a day, one minute it can be wonderfully bright and then suddenly completely darkened by a passing cloud. This can at times be very frustrating but also very freeing, it helps to keep the paint fresh, which when working in the studio can have habit to become overworked.

Paul Finn

Paul Finn
p.finn@me.com
www.paulfinn.co.uk
www.rowleygallery.co.uk


My working method is to draw from direct observation as I walk through the landscape. I work exclusively from the landscape and will usually record places which are familiar to me. When I draw, I use ink and sometimes charcoal, I want something immediate and unfussy to draw with.

Paul Finn
Miss Willmotts garden, 2015, ink on paper, 38 x 28 cm

I will return to a place many times to see the elements of the landscape at different times of the year.

Paul Finn
First sight Dedham, ink on paper, 38 x 28 cm

I need time to evaluate what I have seen, and it takes time before I can begin to think about painting. Paintings recollect the emotion of being in the landscape, in the tranquillity of my studio. There is no set method or recipe to the way I paint; I just try to respond to my memories, and to the atmosphere of the landscape. I paint instinctively but am attracted to the patterns, structure and rhythms of the fields, trees and buildings that I see on my walks.

Paul Finn
Beth Chattos woodland garden, oil, 54 x 55 cm

When I work I feel at ease when editing and changing what is in nature. My best work comes as a result of letting go completely and giving myself up to the paint. When I am brave enough I paint physically and vigorously, making marks sometimes with little regard for the final product.

Paul Finn
The bank opposite ( River Stour ), oil,  60 x 20 cm

Ultimately I want to create paintings which celebrate being in the landscape with all of its infinite variety, and enjoy making paintings where my decisions are visible and where abstract elements counterbalance figurative elements.

Paul Finn
From the Church to the Temple. Oil 100x33


Observations et souvenirs

Ma passion a toujours été le paysage. Ayant grandi dans l’ouest du Yorkshire, entouré de mines de charbon et de moulins à foulon, je pouvais en vingt minutes de marche être dans des endroits préservés, que je découvrirais. J'ai conscience de l'histoire quand je peins et j’admire Corot, Constable, Turner et Bonnard, et tant d'autres. Mes peintures ne sont pas réalisées sur le motif, mais s’élaborent à l’atelier. Elles cherchent à capturer l'essence d'un lieu, peut-être mes premières pensées et impressions. J'aime remarquer la façon dont les arbres réagissent visuellement et se relient aux champs. J'aime la façon dont les couleurs travaillent avec d’autres couleurs, et les formes avec d’autres formes. Je dessine quand je suis dehors dans le paysage et avec cela je rassemble mes souvenirs, mes pensées et mes sentiments dans la tranquillité de l'atelier. J’aime pousser et tirer les couleurs sur l'espace plat d'une toile, dans la structure, dans la nature plastique du plan de l'image. J’aime essayer de recréer un espace vraisemblable. Je ne me lasse jamais du défi d'utiliser ce que j'ai observé, pour le reprendre à l’atelier et recréer mes expériences lorsque j’étais sur place, à partir de ma mémoire et des dessins.

Paul Finn, mars 2017

David Wiseman

David Wiseman
davidcwiseman@yahoo.com
www.davidwiseman.org.uk


The works on canvas are made in the studio and I also work directly from the landscape with a variety of mixed media on smaller works on paper and canvas . 

David Wiseman
David Wiseman, Woodland Water Brownsea Island, pencil on paper, 35 x 25

My painting is  inspired by particular landscape places or events using drawings, photographs and memory. Although spending a lot of time in Devon and the south coast I am equally inspired by local tree lined rivers and parklands close to my Ealing home. 

David Wiseman
David Wiseman, Woodland Life - Distant Water, acrylic, 2016,  102 x 76

My paintings are about the rich contrasting elements in the landscape. The tree which takes on many guises in my paintings is often used as a contrast to the rivers and streams that have recently dominated my work. The relationship between the complex, crowded tree and bush lined river bank and the fluid light and movement of the water is often an important part of my painting. I like to contrast elements ,such as the beautiful complicated pattern of a close up tree trunk against a flash of light in the far distance. When painting outside I try to convey the feeling of being part of the landscape.  I have been a keen runner for many years and most of my running is done along the riverside and canal that inspires much of my painting. 

David Wiseman
David Wiseman, Winter Pitshanger Riverside, 102 x 76, acrylic, 2016

This allows me to be absorbed by the landscape as I pass through it rather than seeing it as a picture postcard cut out image. I also want to instill this feeling of constant change and movement in my paintings.  They are begun in a loose, freely drawn calligraphic way using a series of marks, stains and shapes made with a wide variety of brushes, roller, scraper, sponge, etc.  The final image is slowly extracted in a playful, organic way using overlaid marks and glazes to express qualities of nature such as mood, light, colour, movement, atmosphere, space etc. 

David Wiseman
David Wiseman, Woodland Water, near Abergavenny,  acrylic,  2016,  102 x 76

I am attempting to find equivalents for the landscape in the physical qualities of paint, in order to express a feeling of flux in nature. I want the paintings to be intriguing, tantalising and ambiguous held between the plastic qualities of the paint and all the celebratory  magical illusions and evocations of the depiction of nature.

David Wiseman
David Wiseman, Woodland Water Brownsea Island,  100 x 76,  acrylic , 2016

Je réalise les œuvres sur toile à l’atelier, mais je travaille aussi en extérieur sur papier. Ma peinture s'inspire de paysages ou d'événements particuliers, en recourant aux dessins, aux photographies et aux souvenirs. L'arbre, qui revêt beaucoup d’aspects dans mes peintures, est souvent utilisé en contraste avec les rivières et les ruisseaux qui ont dominé mon travail récent. La relation entre l'arbre, complexe et dense, la rive bordée de buissons de la rivière, et la lumière et le mouvement fluides de l'eau constitue une part importante de mes peintures.

Elles commencent à la façon d’un dessin calligraphique, libre et ample, en utilisant une série de signes, de taches et de formes faits avec une grande variété de brosses, de rouleaux, de grattoirs, d'éponges, etc. L'image finale s’en extrait d'une manière ludique et organique, par signes et glacis superposés, pour exprimer des qualités naturelles comme l’ambiance, la lumière, le mouvement, l’atmosphère, l’espace, etc. Je cherche à trouver des équivalents du paysage dans les qualités physiques de la peinture, afin d'exprimer un sentiment de flux dans la nature. Je veux que les peintures soient intrigantes, séductrices et ambiguës, tenues entre les qualités plastiques de la peinture et toutes les illusions et les évocations magiques et festives du portrait de la nature

Robert Brooks

Robert Brooks
mbbrooks@hotmail.co.uk



As a landscape painter, primarily my objectives have always been to keep the subject and ideas as simple and as coherent as possible. Trees for their beautiful shape and structure fascinate me and provide much inspiration for my work.  Shapes, sizes and relationships, both in colour harmonies as well as drawings are not to be ignored. This emphasis was pummelled into me whilst studying at the Slade School of Fine Art in London, where strict painting methods, including measuring were applied.

Robert Brooks
Large Oak at Throop

Focusing and being truthful to one’s own integrity in art brings much into the drama and beauty of an original artwork. My method was developed and inspired through my tutor Patrick George, who helped me to focus my ideas; as well as one of my muses Cezanne; who’s sheer and direct work got straight to the point of shape and colour, which has influenced my work massively.

Through my early career in the 80’s my style and progression has developed, initially from a somewhat naïve perspective, I have channelled my efforts into simplicity, drawing out the natural beauty seen from the eyes perspective.

When painting on the Purbeck Hills in Dorset, Corfe Castle usually takes on a significant role within my compositions and panorama studies; it does tend to lend itself from any angle and distance.  Seeing a painting slowly come into being; causes much excitement and inspiration towards myself, as well as much joy into my work.

Robert Brooks
Tall Oak at Burley

Not always knowing where to start on a picture can often pose a challenge, but bringing everything together, be it in whatever medium or subject I find myself drawn to; this challenge is frequently what gives me much enthusiasm towards my main pursuit.

Jacqueline Wedlake Hatton

Jacqueline Wedlake Hatton
wedlakehatton@icloud.com
www.jacquiwedlakehatton.com


My recent work is focussed on small pockets of ancient woodlands on Dartmoor such as Wistman’s Wood and Hucken Tor. These I have chosen because of their wildness and for the unusual shapes of the trees there. The habitats of the moorland trees is very specific in terms of altitude and terrain. This geology results in unusual growth patterns and a proliferation of mosses which grow on the trees and everything around them. I am Cornish and to some extent my work pays homage to the ancient Cornish culture which is so bound up with nature and the landscape. However, it also references the processes and influences of technology and how those infiltrate our experience of even the most natural sites in our landscape. 

Jacqueline Wedlake Hatton
Insider, Oil on canvas, 1 m x 1 m, 2015

I have allowed my love of the beauty of woodlands a free rein in my recent paintings. However, I find that other themes emerge and what appears on the canvas is more than a simple image of woodland. Intuitive gestures made with paint belie the complexity of the relationship between circumstance, locality and context.  The ancient trees that are my current subject are so old that they represent the concept of time, they link my consciousness to the lives of my ancestors and their scarcity is a reminder of the deforestation that is so threatening in our post-modern era. So a landscape painting is never just a landscape but has this interestingly dream like aspect, interwoven and interconnecting, where all of those themes coincide. 

Jacqueline Wedlake Hatton
Fogged, oil on canvas, 1 m x 1.20 m, 2016

With regard to the process that initiated my current work, locating my 'voice' is a triangulation between memory, photography and canvas or hand, eye and mind. What I have found is that my voice is an amalgam, its constituent parts being those of myself, with mechanical processes and products - such as photography. I am surprised and intrigued by the way these aspects blend together on the canvas. 

Jacqueline Wedlake Hatton
Snake, oil on canvas, 1 m x 1.20 m, 2015


Dans mes derniers tableaux d'arbres la photographie a exercé une influence marquée sur ma perception visuelle et sur mon style de représentation. On dit de la peinture qu'elle reflète tout ce que l'artiste est et a éprouvé. Par conséquent, inscrits dans les couches de couleur se trouvent non seulement mon expérience de la peinture, mais aussi l'expérience culturelle de grandir en Cornouailles, mes centres d’intérêt artistiques et scientifiques, la culture pop et ainsi de suite. Dans mon esprit tout cela complète un cercle qui relie le physique à l'éthéré, donnant forme à l'expérience et aux idées lorsqu'elles rencontrent des « réalités ».

Inévitablement, je suis surtout attirée par les arbres qui ont quelque chose d’inhabituel dans leur forme, témoignage de la façon dont l'arbre a répondu aux événements et aux conditions de son environnement. De plus en plus, je suis consciente des histoires que les gens attachent à de tels arbres. Et ce n'est pas moins vrai des histoires qu'un public se raconte au sujet des peintures. Lorsque je réalisais les études sur les arbres de la région de Vaux en France, je me rendais compte que j'étais moins empêtrée dans mon propre bagage culturel. Et je peux discerner une plus grande légèreté dans les études que j’y ai faites.

Paul Ridyard

Paul Ridyard
info@paulridyard.com
www.paulridyard.com


My work reflects a passion for ancient woodland, localized mythology and the unusual and distorted; naturally occurring forms to which I am drawn. I spend much of my time seeking out extraordinary trees on the Internet and then visiting them, much like a tourist. I then work mainly from the snapshots I take, which are manipulated to accentuate any ambiguities I find. I am drawn to the wonder of these ancient, mutated and exposed subjects developing any new readings and relationships, as material flattened to images, they might suggest.

Paul Ridyard
Dean, 2011, pencil on paper mounted on dibond, 55cm x 70cm

The work becomes a re-generation of the content of the photographs and questions the authenticity of our experience of the natural. I try to assimilate the photographic image as closely as possible and hope that by doing so, in a handmade fashion, that each pencil mark undermines any absolute notions of true or false. Instead it merges the documentation of these rare and compelling objects with the uniqueness of direct experience of them.
Paul Ridyard
Root-ball II, 2013, pencil on paper mounted on dibond, 113cm x 122cm

Recently, I have focused on trees that have had the ground around them eroded due to some external factor, revealing bizarre, exposed shapes. When I first came across them they were referred to locally as ‘ the walking trees’. This seemed ridiculous. However this irresistible, irrational, yet romantic notion took me on a day trip to the woods. These drawings engage with my interest in subjects, which I see as suggesting more than one thing and their new reading when isolated from their original surroundings.

Paul Ridyard
Unterholz, 2015, pencil on paper mounted on dibond, 100cm x 70cm


Au cours des 10 dernières années, mon travail s’est centré sur la recherche d'arbres extraordinaires via Internet pour ensuite les visiter, tout comme un touriste. Je suis attiré par la merveille de ces sujets anciens, métamorphosés et vulnérables. Et je développe toutes sortes de nouvelles lectures et de nouveaux rapports qu’ils , pourraient suggérer, comme matériaux rapportés aux images planes.

Mon travail le plus récent présente des arbres autour desquels le sol a été érodé en raison de quelque facteur extérieur, révélant des formes bizarres, à nu. Lorsque j’ai croisé leur chemin, ils étaient appelés localement « les arbres qui marchent ». Cela semblait ridicule. Cependant, cette notion romantique m'a conduit à une excursion d'une journée dans les bois. Ces dessins participent de mon intérêt pour des sujets qui me semblent suggérer plus d'une seule chose et pour leur nouvelle lecture lorsqu'ils sont isolés de leur environnement d'origine.

Mes dessins deviennent une re-génération du contenu des photographies et  questionnent l'authenticité de notre expérience du naturel. J'essaie d'assimiler l'image photographique le plus fidèlement possible et j'espère qu'en procédant ainsi, de façon artisanale, chaque marque de crayon mine toute notion absolue de vrai ou de faux. A la place, cela combine la documentation de ces objets rares et fascinants avec le caractère unique de leur expérience directe.