Les Arboréalistes pour la première fois en France

A great, amazing and laudatory first article in the newspaper today
Un premier article magnifique et élogieux dans le journal aujourd'hui.

A first step in France and Europe !
Un premier pas en France et en Europe !






Dortoir des Moines de Saint-Benoît

The Arborealists
Les arbres de la Vienne

Poitiers, France
du 3 au 31 juillet 2017


9h - 12h30 et  13h30 - 18h
du lundi au samedi
Monday to Saturday


Ouvert dimanches 9 et 30 juillet
Open on  Sunday 9 and 30 July
de 13h30 à 18h


Vernissage vendredi 7 juillet
Private view Friday 7 July


17h30 - 19h30


Trente artistes internationaux




Jacqueline Wedlake Hatton, Snake, Serpent


Fondé en 2013 au Royaume-Uni, le groupe 'The Arborealists' rassemble aujourd'hui une cinquantaine d'artistes internationaux réunis par leur intérêt commun pour les arbres, pour leur représentation et leur préservation. Ils organisent régulièrement des expositions Outre-Manche et présentent pour la première fois leurs travaux en France à Saint-Benoît.


Office de Tourisme/ADECT
11, rue Paul Gauvin
86280 SAINT-BENOIT
Tél/fax : 05 49 47 44 53
ot@saintbenoit86.fr
www.ville-saint-benoit.fr



Nature in Art Gallery and Museum, Gloucester


The Arborealists
at Nature in Art Gallery and Museum, Gloucester

11th April 2017 – 14th May 2017

natureinart.org.uk/event/the-arborealists/


"A celebration of trees, with work almost exclusively by members of The Arborealists, a group of 43 artists with a national profile, from Wales to East Anglia and Sussex to Cornwall, of diverse art practice, philosophy, scale, medium, style and technique, who share the rich and versatile subject of the tree."

Book review in 'The British Art Journal'

'The British Art Journal'

publishes a book review of ‘The Arborealists: The Art of the Tree’
by Helen Cobby



"The Arborealists: The Art of the Tree with essays by Angela Summerfield, Philippa Beale and Peter Davies. Published April 2016 by Sansom & Co.
Helen Cobby

Trees and woodlands have held a special place in the British landscape and soul for centuries. They nurture complex ecosystems, are crucial for our own survival, and provide unique environments as well as aesthetic structures that signal both local and national identities. Trees are firmly entwined with our cultural heritage and have fascinated artists and writers as diverse as Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Constable, Hardy and the Pre-Raphaelites.
..."


The Arborealists at Waterstones Piccadilly on Friday 28th October 2016

The Art of the Tree

on Friday 28th October 2016, 06:30 pm

Join members of the Arborealist group on Friday 28th October 06:30 pm at Waterstones Piccadilly bookshop to discuss their work and the significance of trees in their art. 


The Arborealists: The Art of the Tree


To look inside the book,
please click on the cover image above

Waterstones Piccadilly
London - Piccadilly
203/206 Piccadilly
London, W1J9HD
www.waterstones.com





Sansom & Co
81g Pembroke Road
Clifton
Bristol BS8 3EA

128 pages, over 70 full colour illustrations, including works of :

Jemma Appleby, Mary Anne Aytoun-Ellis, Jo Barry, Richard Bavin, Philippa Beale, Mick Bennett, John Blandy, Karen Bowers, Guillaume Brandy, Brandy-Dalschaert, Robert Brooks, Hannah Brown, Emma Buckmaster, Peter Clossick, Gary Colclough, Tim Craven, Blaze Cyan, Francis Dalschaert, Celia De SerraSimon Dorrell, Michelle Dovey, Janet French, Sarah Harding, Dan Hays, Fiona Hingston, Abi Kremer, Ffiona Lewis, Hannah Maybank, Fiona McIntyre, Wladyslaw Mirecki, Annie Ovenden, Alex Pemberton, Julian Perry, Howard Phipps, Michael Porter, Nick Schlee, Lesley Slight, Angela Summerfield

The Arborealists at Vaux

The Arborealists visit Vaux
to prepare future exhibition near Poitiers in July 2017


From 14th to 16th October, a group of Arborealists visited the village of Vaux and its area, near Poitiers, France.

Their purpose was to collect images of trees for paintings to be exhibited at Le Dortoir des Moines, Saint Benoit, near Poitiers, France in July 2017.

Saint-Benoit Abbey
near Poitiers

Les Arboréalistes visitent Vaux
et préparent leur future exposition à Poitiers en juillet 2017

Du 14 au 16 octobre un groupe d'Arboréalistes a visité le village de Vaux et sa région afin de collecter des images d'arbres en préparation de leur exposition au Dortoir des Moines de Saint Benoit en Juillet 2017.

Arborealists and their friends
at Francis and Guillaume studio in Couhé

The old bridge at the village of Vaux
upon the river "La Bouleur"

Philippa Beale presenting her work
'Chemin de Croix' or 'Stations of the Cross'
at the XII th. century Church of the Virgin at Vaux

Carved corbels called "modillons"
on the facade of the church of Vaux

The river "Le Clain" at Anché

"A Tree Within" by Arborealist Fiona McIntyre

"A Tree Within"

An exhibition to coincide with the publication of Arborealist artist Fiona McIntyre new book 'A Tree Within'.

A monograph with interview by Art Historian Dr. Alan Wilkinson and a foreword by Southampton curator Tim Craven. The book explores Fiona's artistic development from Edinburgh to Scandinavia to the Cotswolds until her recent incarnation as an Arborealist.


http://sansomandcompany.co.uk/shopping/fiona-mcintyre-a-tree-within/



Exhibition
14th September - 31st October
The Bishop’s Palace
Wells - Somerset - BA5 2PD

Telephone: 01749 988111
Jo.watkinson@bishopspalace.org.uk

https://bishopspalace.org.uk/2016/07/06/fiona-mcintyre-the-tree-within/

http://www.fionamcintyre.com/index.aspx?sectionid=1212414

Westonbirt Treefest

The Westonbirt Treefest exhibition will showcase the work of about 12 Arborealists and their new fully illustrated publication will also be on sale.


Westonbirt Arboretum
26th August - 31st August


The Arborealists are a 40 strong group of artists of diverse art practice who share the subject of the tree. From 2013 these artists have joined together for exhibitions in galleries across the south of England to national acclaim, including The Royal West of England Academy, Bristol, and St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery, Lymington. Their artworks are at turns dramatic and contemplative, demonstrating that trees still have relevance in contemporary art and retain the power to move us all as a vital element in our landscape and sense of national identity.

Trees provide a wonderfully versatile subject for artists, not only in terms of the variety of form, character and colour they provide, whether individually or collectively, but also for their wealth of association, myth, folklore, religious, symbolic and ecological significance, which they have come to embody. In Britain trees have inspired artists from Gainsborough and Constable through to Paul Nash, the Neo-Romantics, the Ruralists and David Hockney.


Art Historian Sister Wendy congratulates The Arborealists

Sister Wendy has written to St Barbe Museum, Lymington, to congratulate us on our exhibition earlier this year.

The art historian and TV presenter, who now lives a hermetic life at a nunnery in Norfolk, wrote to say how much she has enjoyed reading the fully-illustrated catalogue of The Arborealists.

Sister Wendy shot to fame in the 1990s when she presented programmes, such as ''Sister Wendy's Odyssey'' and ''Sister Wendy's Grand Tour,'' which often drew a 25 percent share of the British viewing audience. Sister Wendy made her U.S. debut on U.S. public television and that same year The New York Times described her as "a sometime hermit who is fast on her way to becoming the most unlikely and famous art critic in the history of television."

In her letter, Sister Wendy says: 

"The Arborealists catalogue has been a great joy to me. It's a magnificent concept and so well carried out". 



Private view at St-Barbe

Thursday 21 April 2016
Fabulous launch of major exhibition

St Barbe Museum & Art Gallery, Lymington 23rd April – 3rd June 2016

Thanks to everyone who attended

The Arborealists – trees in contemporary art at St Barbe Museum & Art Gallery, Lymington



The Arborealists – trees in contemporary art exhibition
St Barbe Museum & Art Gallery, Lymington 23rd April – 3rd June 2016


The Arborealists, a major new exhibition at St Barbe Museum & Art Gallery, Lymington will showcase works by 35 contemporary artists on the common theme of trees. Although united in their subject, they use an incredibly varied set of working practices. The exhibition opens on Saturday 23rd April and runs until Saturday, 3rd June 2016.

In 2013, St Barbe Museum & Art Gallery mounted a successful two-part exhibition Under the Greenwood – Picturing the British Tree; the second exhibition featured contemporary artists’ responses to the subject. Such was the impact of this show, and the spirit of camaraderie engendered in a truly diverse group of artists, that they took on a more permanent identity as the Arborealists.

The artists have joined together for exhibitions in galleries across the south and are now coming to St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery in April. Their artworks are at turns dramatic and contemplative, demonstrating that trees still have relevance in contemporary art and retain the power to move us all as a vital element in our landscape and sense of national identity.

Those exhibiting include Jemma Appleby, Mary Anne Aytoun-Ellis, Jo Barry, Guillaume Brandy and Francis Dalschaert, Tim Craven, Michelle Dovey, Dan Hays, Ffiona Lewis, Fiona McIntyre, Wladyslaw Mirecki, Michael Porter, Howard Phipps and Celia de Serra.

Trees provide a wonderfully versatile subject for artists, not only in terms of the incredible diversity of form, character and colour they provide, whether individually or collectively, but also in terms of the wealth of association, myth, folklore, religious and symbolic significance, which they have come to embody. In Britain they have inspired artists from Gainsborough and Constable through to Paul Nash, the Neo-Romantics and the Ruralists.

The Arborealists at St Barbe Museum & Art Gallery will be open Monday-Saturday, 10am-4pm. Tickets, which include entry into the museum, cost £6 for adults, £5 for senior citizens and students, £3 for children aged 5-15 years and £12 for a family of two adults and up to four children (including a voluntary gift aid donation); under fives are admitted free of charge. For details visit www.stbarbe-museum.org.uk or telephone 01590 676969.


Press release (pdf)



www.stbarbe-museum.org.uk/whats-on/current-exhibition.php

Next exhibition

The Arborealists will stage their third exhibition at St Barbe Museum and Art gallery, Lymington. The Arborealists , 23rd April – 4th June 2016, will feature new works by 35 artists  and each will show just one work to emphasise the diversity of art practice prevalent within the group – in terms of size, medium, style and philosophy.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a new publication on the group. This will include an introduction on art historical links, the origins and development of the group by Tim Craven, an essay entitled “Why do Artists Paint Trees” by Dr Angela Summerfield, an essay entitled “Cultivation of Trees and western Culture” by Philippa Beale and a survey on of the work by the exhibiting artists by art historian Peter Davies. The catalogue will be fully illustrated together with a statement by each artist.

St Barbe is an excellent art gallery in the heart of the New Forest and was the venue for the group’s originating exhibition, Under the Greenwood: Picturing the British Tree in 2013. It’s great to be back with more and new artists!



Ann Arnold 1936-2015

Ann Arnold exhibited with the Arborealists at The Royal West of England Academy, Bristol, in 2014 and at Mottisfont Abbey NT, Romsey, in 2015. She also showed in the seminal Under the Greenwood: Picturing the British Tree exhibition at St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery, Lymington, in 2013 – the originating exhibition for the Arborealists. Ann was a brilliant artist with an strong personal, pastoral vision and she will be sorely missed.

Ann was born in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne and brought up in Surrey. She was educated at Sutton High School for Girls. Despite being beset by illness, she graduated in painting at Epsom School of Art. Also in Epsom she was introduced to the Burgh Heath Centre for the care of young people with mental illness, where a range of the arts, music, drama and especially painting were employed as therapy. At the forefront of a new profession, Ann trained to become an art therapist, working in many hospitals and she also assisted with setting-up the first degree course. Ann later founded the Association of Art Therapists. In 1961 she married the painter Graham Arnold and together they, and David Inshaw founded the Broadheath Brotherhood of artists, the forerunner of the celebrated Brotherhood of Ruralists of which she was also a member. 
The Brotherhood of Ruralists staged its inaugural exhibition at The Royal Academy in 1976. The seven members who included Peter Blake of Pop Art fame, proclaimed to express through personal vision and experience of their native heritage, a celebration of the English countryside. A ruralist is defined as someone who moves to the country from the city, and this was largely true of the group. The brotherhood believed that Romanticism was a neglected strand in British art, and that if re-introduced, might solve some of the problems that they believed were rife in much of contemporary painting. They looked for inspiration to the art of William Blake, Samuel Palmer and the Brotherhood of Ancients, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and to Victorian painting, design and photography in general. They profoundly disagreed with the view espoused by modern art orthodoxy that the sensibility and practice of their favourite nineteenth century artists were merely an eccentric dead-end and marginal to the progression of mainstream western art.

The Ruralists’ unfashionable stance however struck a chord and with assistance from substantial media publicity (including a BBC film) and various sell-out touring exhibitions, enjoyed huge popular success. Espousing a Romantic approach to art and life, their vision is encapsulated by a John Piper quote as: of something significant beyond ordinary significance, something that for a moment seems to contain the whole world and when that moment is past carries over comment on life or experience besides the comment on appearances.

In 1974 Ann and Graham moved to south west Shropshire where they acquired a steep hill of 50 acres. With the help of a tree specialist friend, they planted 6,000 trees on the hill. Ann was continuously inspired to draw and paint the surrounding landscape and she exhibited widely, at prestigious galleries throughout the UK and as far afield as Berlin and Tokyo to universal acclaim. Ann was an academician of the South West Academy of Fine and Applied Arts.

Tim Craven

Meet the Arborealists at Mottisfont

On Saturday 17 october 2015, visitors met some of the Arborealists artists who created new works for the exhibition 'Art of trees' at Mottisfont Abbey. Each artists talked about how they work and what inspires them, on their influences and art practice with trees.





The Art of Trees at Mottisfont Abbey


Arborealists: The Art of Trees

19 September - 15 November 11am - 5pm


Our new exhibition celebrates the art of trees through paintings, drawings, prints and sculpture this autumn. Created especially for us, 'Arborealists: the Art of Trees' draws on a rich tradition of the tree as a vital subject for art.

Trees have proved an important source of artistic inspiration for centuries. From John Constable to David Hockney, artists have employed the largest plant on earth as a metaphor, symbol, decoration and stylistic device.

A new group of contemporary artists called the Arborealists are now adding fresh work to this tradition. Following a highly successful exhibition at the Royal West of England Academy in Bristol, the Arborealists are creating a unique show for Mottisfont, which will include new work exhibited for the first time.

Centred on the single subject of the tree, a versatile and rich subject for art, a key feature of the group is diversity of art practice with regard to medium, scale, philosophy, style and technique.
On display will be intricate pencil drawings of root systems, gorgeous autumnal colours and beautiful natural sculpture. Minutely detailed drawings, delicate wood engravings and fine etchings resonate with vibrant, and expressive watercolours and oil paintings. Complex trees drawn from life will contrast with conceptual forest landscapes.

Former National Trust forester John Surplice has worked on fallen trees found around the grounds and estate to reveal spectacular sculptural forms. Lizzie Sykes worked with older performers' group Mind the Gap as part of an artist's residency at Mottisfont to create The Greeting, a film that grew from the group's responses to trees here.

Full list of appearing artists: Robert Amesbury-Brookes, Jemma Appleby, Ann Arnold, Graham Arnold, Mary Anne Aytoun-Ellis, Jo Barry, Philippa Beale, John Blandy, Hannah Brown, Peter Clossick, Gary Colclough, Marcus Cornish, Tim Craven, Dalschaert and Brandy, Michelle Dovey, Kurt Jackson, Abi Kremer, Ffiona Lewis, Hannah Maybank, Fiona McIntyre, Alexander Pemberton, Howard Phipps, Michael Porter, Julian Perry, Nick Schlee, Celia de Serra, Lesley Slight, Angela Summerfield, John Surplice and Lizzie Sykes.


Arboretum at the Royal West of England Academy


The Art of Trees; the Arborealists and other Artists

19 December 2014 - 8 March 2015


Celebrating Bristol's year as European Green Capital, the RWA launches its winter programme on a fittingly 'green' theme, with Arboretum, exploring the rich history of the tree in art. Here, beneath the shade and shelter of towering trunks, amidst gnarled roots and leafy canopies, the real and the imagined sit side-by-side transforming the RWA's main galleries into a wooded hinterland.

Drawing on the romantic tradition in art, alongside ecological issues - such as Julian Perry's investigation into experimental forestry work in Three Pollards - Arboretum intertwines art and environment, capturing a very British symbol of life and renewal. Our 'trees, like ruins, embody history'; which proves to be a consistent thread that runs throughout each artist's work. Dan Hays composes paintings that reflect the low-resolution appearance of early digital photography building up an image with a series of individual pixels. In a similar vein, Hannah Maybank's epic textured surfaces are constructed of delicate layers of paint over latex, built up in stratum like the coiled concentric circles that lie beneath the brittle bark of a tree. These seductive layers of peeling paint are suggestive of a vast history entombed beneath.

Jo Barry, Tim Craven and Celia de Serra's detailed pen and ink drawings depict the minutia of trees, from the monstrosity of fallen trunks to skeletal branches, whereas Royal Academician Anthony Whishaw aims to capture what he refers to as a general 'treeness'. Featuring fifty shades of green, Fiona McIntyre, Michelle Dovey and Abi Kremer capture the fabric of the forest in surreal technicolour, foiled by the muted tapestry of Fiona Hingston's tree-scapes dragged from the earth in soil and charcoal.

Memory and observation are called upon to create places both real, remembered and imagined. Kurt Jackson's scored and scratched depictions of woodland combine the scrubby, wind-blasted copse of Skewjack in West Cornwall with the rich forest interior of Ashcombe near Bath, informed by memories of Jackson's boyhood spent exploring the squirrel and jay filled oak woodlands of Hertfordshire. In contrast Jemma Appleby's disquieting forest landscape punctuated by the surprising presence of cantilevered rooftops, inspired by the Unison houses of Frank Lloyd Wright, relies on a sense of illusion to create an imagined place. Here, caught somewhere between the tree-top canopy and forest floor hangs a very British blend of fact and folklore, myth and magic, culture and conservation; our past and our future.

Arboretum follows on from the critically acclaimed and highly popular Under the Greenwood - Picturing the British Tree at St Barbe Museum and Art Gallery. Reprising themes from the contemporary element of this show it explores the importance of the tree as a rich and vital subject for art, featuring work from members of the Arborealists: Jemma Appleby, Ann Arnold, Graham Arnold, Mary Anne Aytoun-Ellis, Joanna Barry, Philippa Beale, John Blandy, Hannah Brown, Gary Colclough, Tim Craven, Celia de Serra, Michelle Dovey, Dan Hays, Abi Kremer , Ffiona Lewis, Fiona MacIntyre, Hannah Maybank, Alexander Pemberton, Julian Perry, Lesley Slight and RWA Academicians Nicola Bealing RWA, Martin Bentham RWA, Kurt Jackson RWA, Howard Phipps RWA, Michael Porter RWA, Anthony Whishaw RWA and Lisa Wright RWA.

Arboretum will be showing at the RWA in conjunction with The British Wildlife Photography Awards 2014: A Celebration of British Wildlife. This launches the start of a programme of environmentally focused exhibitions at the RWA engaging with nature and landscape to celebrate the start of Bristol's year as the Green Capital.


Under the Greenwood at the Gerald Moore Gallery, Eltham College


Under the Greenwood: Picturing British Trees -- Present

Saturday 5th April until Saturday 7th June 2014, 12-4pm


Under the Greenwood Picturing British Trees - Present, the new exhibition at Gerald Moore Gallery, South East London, looks at how artists working today are still drawing inspiration from the British tree.

Thirty two contemporary artists including Turner Prize 2011 nominee George Shaw and Old Elthamian Jemma Appleby, have been invited to contribute a work, which shows how trees figure in their art practice.  The exhibition examines their different approach from the digital manipulations of Dan Hays, Christiane Baumgartner and Katsutoshi Yuasa to the plein air paintings of Michelle Dovey.

David Nash's Ash Dome takes on new meaning in the light of the latest fungal threat to our native trees; George Shaw revisits the childhood mysteries of a patch of urban woodland, while Ann Arnold, Graham Arnold and David Inshaw imbue the Wessex landscape with a sense of magic and wonder. Hannah Maybank, Mick Moon, Anthony Whishaw and Paul Winstanley explore the threshold where, as the light fades, familiarity and reassurance meet otherworldliness and doubt.

Contributing Artists: Jemma Appleby, Ann Arnold, Graham Arnold, Jo Barry, Christiane Baumgartner, Philippa Beale, John Blandy, Tim Craven, Michelle Dovey, Dan Hays, David Inshaw, Abi Kremer, Ffiona Lewis, Elizabeth Magill, Hannah Maybank, Fiona M. E. MacIntyre, Mick Moon, Paul Morrison, David Nash, Howard Phipps, Michael Porter, Lisa Ruyter, John Salt, Nick Schlee, Celia de Serra, George Shaw, Lesley Slight, Alice Stepanek and Steven Maslin, Anthony Whishaw, Paul Winstanley, Clare Woods, and Katsutoshi Yuasa.

The exhibition was developed by St. Barbe Museum and Art Gallery and produced in partnership with Southampton City Art Gallery.

A fully illustrated catalogue covering this exhibition and its sister exhibition, Under the Greenwood Picturing British Trees - Past and Present is available.

Under the Greenwood at St-Barbe Museum


Picturing British Trees - Present

12th October - 23rd November


This companion exhibition to our historic trees show looks at how artists working today are still drawing inspiration from trees. It examines contemporary artists' approach to trees from the digital manipulations of Dan Hays, Christiane Baumgartner and Katsutoshi Yuasa to the plein air paintings of Kurt Jackson and Michelle Dovey. David Nash's Ash Dome takes on new meaning in the light of the latest fungal threat to our native trees. George Shaw revisits the childhood mysteries of a patch of urban woodland. Ann Arnold, Graham Arnold and David Inshaw imbue the Wessex landscape with a sense of magic and wonder. Hannah Maybank, Mick Moon, Anthony Whishaw and Paul Winstanley explore the threshold where, as the light fades, familiarity and reassurance meet otherworldliness and doubt.

We have invited thirty-three artists to contribute a work and explain what trees mean to them and how they figure in their art practice. Those contributing are: Jemma Appleby, Ann Arnold, Graham Arnold, Christiane Baumgartner, Jo Barry, Philippa Beale, John Blandy, Tim Craven, Michelle Dovey, Dan Hays, David Inshaw, Kurt Jackson, Abi Kremer, Ffiona Lewis, Fiona M. E. McIntyre, Elizabeth Magill, Hannah Maybank, Mick Moon, Paul Morrison, David Nash, Howard Phipps, Michael Porter, Lisa Ruyter, John Salt, Nick Schlee, Celia de Serra, George Shaw, Lesley Slight, Alice Stepanek and Steven Maslin, Anthony Whishaw, Paul Winstanley, Clare Woods and Katsutoshi Yuasa.

Exhibition produced in partnership with Southampton City Art Gallery.

Sponsored by Rathbones.